Mark H. Stoler, MD, FASCP

ASCP Israel Davidsohn Award for Distinguished Service

“Through my many experiences at ASCP, I have gained tremendous insights into the profession and how the world works that I would not have gained otherwise. The more I learned about how central pathology and laboratory medicine are to modern medicine, the more I want to make it better and educate the rest of the world about its value.”
—Mark H. Stoler, MD, FASCP

Internationally renowned for his expertise in gynecologic pathology, cytopathology, and molecular diagnostics, Mark H. Stoler, MD, FASCP, has sought for more than 30 years to understand why cervical cancer occurs and how to improve its early detection, diagnosis, and treatment. His work stands out for his unflagging persistence to ongoing research in cervical cancer.

Dr, Stoler counts as his mentors some of the giants in the field of cytopathology, including Stanley F. Patten, Jr., MD, PhD, FASCP, and Thomas A. Bonfiglio, MD, MASCP, both of whom inspired him in the criteria-based approach to diagnostics and gave him his teaching start  with ASCP.

“I’ve always been interested in finding out why tissue looks as it does,” Dr. Stoler said. “Specifically understanding the cellular biology that produces the classic microscopic morphology, so we can then better teach the criteria for diagnosis, has been a goal I think we have achieved.”

After earning his medical degree at the University of Rochester School of Medicine, Rochester, N.Y. He completed his residency and a fellowship in surgical and cytopathology at the University of Rochester Medical Center, where he was on the faculty until 1989. He then worked at the Cleveland Clinic until 1993 when he moved to Virginia. Currently, he is Professor (Emeritus) of Pathology, Cytology, and Gynecology and Director of the Gynecological Pathology Fellowship Program at the University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, Va.

Active in many pathology organizations, Dr. Stoler has given most generously of his time and leadership to ASCP. Every year since 1984, he has continuously given one or more teaching courses for ASCP both at the Annual Meeting and in a variety of other venues and formats. Since 1990, he has also been a member of the American Journal of Clinical Pathology Editorial Review Board. He has served on numerous ASCP committees for more than 25 years. For more than 12 years, Dr. Stoler was a member of the Board of Directors, including eight years on the Executive Committee, culminating as ASCP President from 2009 to 2010.

“It was my good fortune and privilege to serve and help lead ASCP through a long period of tremendous change and outstanding strategic planning,” Dr. Stoler said. Having helped craft the concept of patient-centered advocacy that is now a core strategy for ASCP is something of which he is admittedly proud. For these extraordinary contributions to science and for his service to the Society, he is receiving the 2012 ASCP Israel Davidsohn Award for Distinguished Service. The award recognizes an ASCP Fellow who has made significant contributions to the Society by participating in several leadership roles throughout his or her life.

“Through my many experiences at ASCP, I have gained tremendous insights into the profession and how the world works that I would not have gained otherwise,” Dr. Stoler said. “The more I learned about how central pathology and laboratory medicine are to modern medicine, the more I want to make it better and educate the rest of the world about its value.”

To further that goal, Dr. Stoler’s work has taken him around the world. In 2011, he worked on behalf of ASCP Global Outreach with the Rwandan Ministry of Health to help improve the laboratory infrastructure in that country. A pivotal contributor to the 2012 ASC-ASCP-ASCCP Cervical Cancer Screening guidelines, as well as the 2012 Lower Anogenital Squamous Terminology project, he is currently persuading doctors and patients to combine HPV testing with Pap testing for improved and less costly screening of cervical cancer. He is also teaching others about the use of biomarkers to improve diagnostic accuracy. For these and other patient-centric efforts, last spring, Dr. Stoler was also awarded the 2012 Distinguished Scientific Achievement Award, the highest honor given by the American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology.