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<br>Yen-Michael Hsu, MD, PhD, explains how coagulation assays are performed and interpreted to laboratory professionals in the Hospital Bernard Mevs Clinical Laboratory in Port-au-Prince, Haiti.

Yen-Michael Hsu, MD, PhD, explains how coagulation assays are performed and interpreted to laboratory professionals in the Hospital Bernard Mevs Clinical Laboratory in Port-au-Prince, Haiti.

ASCP Subspecialty Grant Recipient Develops Hematologic Profile of Haitians

Monday, October 08, 2012

In August, pathology resident Yen-Michael Hsu, MD, PhD, spent a week-long clinical rotation at Hospital Bernard Mevs in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, teaching lab professionals to use new assays to test for abnormal blood clotting.

He also took blood samples donated by 30 healthy hospital employees to develop a hematologic profile of local Haitians. In the developing world, baselines are often taken from published reference ranges derived from unknown sources and are not specific to the local population.

“This profile is important in providing reference ranges critical for interpreting test results and providing therapeutic guidance in treating coagulopathic diseases,” said Dr. Hsu, a resident at Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis.

“Thanks to Michael, we now have an authentic local reference range that is valuable.”
—David Andrews, MD

Dr. Hsu was awarded a $2,000 ASCP Resident Subspecialty Grant to do a clinical rotation with David Andrews, MD, Associate Professor of Clinical Pathology and Director of the Special Coagulation Laboratory at the University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, Fla.  

“Thanks to Michael, we now have an authentic local reference range that is valuable,” said Dr. Andrews, who directs laboratory operations at Hospital Bernard Mevs through a partnership with Project Medishare Haiti.   

The ASCP Resident Subspecialty Grants are designed to assist residents interested in obtaining subspecialty experience in pathology by performing rotations with well-known experts at large centers of study for their subspecialty interest or in other countries where pathology is practiced differently. These “away” rotations provide valuable experience for residents, yet carry a financial burden as most programs do not assist with housing or transportation costs, according to Enid Boeding, MD, Chair of the ASCP Resident Subspecialty Grant Committee.

Emily Glynn, MD

The ASCP Resident Council seeks to bridge that gap by offering the subspecialty grants. Many recipients leave their subspecialty rotation with published research, secure a fellowship, or change their career path. Each year, ASCP awards $22,000 in the subspecialty grant program, which are divided between Round 1 and Round 2. Applications for Round 2 of the grants are due on Jan. 15, 2013.

Grant recipient Emily Glynn, MD, will travel to Kenya this year to study surgical pathology with an emphasis on tropical pathology at Kijabe Hospital. A pathology resident at the University of Washington, Seattle, she will work under the supervision of Rochelle Garcia, MD, Associate Professor of Pathology, Director of the Surgical Pathology Fellowship, and Residency Director at the University of Washington Medical Center.

“I am interested in public health, specifically as it relates to pathology and laboratory medicine," Dr. Glynn said. “As our specialty is inherently a step away from direct patient care, I believe issues related to public and global health are not emphasized in traditional pathology training curricula.”

Aaron Hartman, MD

In Kenya, she hopes to improve her diagnostic skills by practicing pathology in a setting where ancillary studies such as immunohistochemical stains and flow cytometric are not readily available; gain exposure to tropical pathology; and learn the challenges of operating a clinical lab in Kenya to gain insight on implementing cost-effective lab practices.  

Aaron Hartman, MD, a pathology resident at Lenox Hill Hospital, Manhattan, New York, will use his grant to cover the costs of travel to North Shore-Long Island Jewish Hospital, Long Island, N.Y., for a rotation in cytogenetics, an essential portion of his pathology training.

ASCP receives many applications during each round. Dr. Boeding encourages residents who are not selected on their first application to reapply. Additionally, residents may still apply and be considered for a grant up to one year after their rotation has taken place. For information about the ASCP Resident Subspecialty Grant, visit www.ascp.org/Residents/Resident-Grants.


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