aids callout
Ebola Podcast
oNElAB MEMO CALLOUT
<br>Mrs. McLeod <!--Mrs. McLeod presented her poster at the 2012 American Association of Pathologists’ Assistants Conference in Miami.-->

Mrs. McLeod

ASCP Award Inspires New Generation of Lab Leaders

Monday, July 22, 2013

“The [ASCP National Student Honor] Award lets potential employers know that I worked hard to keep my grades up and be involved in extra-curricular activities. What I love about pathology is that there are so many different roles in the laboratory that you can find your niche.” 
—Catherine Cory McLeod, PA(ASCP)CM

Catherine Cory McLeod, PA(ASCP)CM, exhibited such strong leadership skills in the Pathologists’ Assistant Program at Quinnipiac University, Hamden, Conn., that her professor selected her to be a student teacher in her second year.   

“She was excellent,” says Leo Kelly, PA(ASCP)CM, Master of Health Science Clinical Coordinator of the Pathology Assistant Program. “She helped out in two classes of first-year students and answered their questions after class, all while working eight-hour days, five days a week, for her clinical rotation.”

Mrs. McLeod, who graduated in May and has passed the ASCP Board of Certification exam, is one of 402 individuals who received the 2013 ASCP National Student Honor Award. The award is given to individuals who demonstrate an outstanding academic record, leadership skills, and a commitment to community service.

“The award lets potential employers know that I worked hard to keep my grades up and be involved in extra-curricular activities,” says Mrs. McLeod, now a pathologists’ assistant at Strata Pathology Services, in Lexington, Mass. “What I love about pathology is that there are so many different roles in the laboratory that you can find your niche.”

Mr. Cabrera-Abarca

Award recipient Juan Cabrera-Abarca,
MLS(ASCP)CM, says the recognition validates that the work he has done is paying off, and that he is on the right track with his career. A native of Peru, he earned a bachelor’s degree from the University of Wisconsin, Stevens Point, in May and has passed the ASCP BOC certification as a medical laboratory scientist. During his school training, he completed a six-month internship at St. Michael’s Hospital in Stevens Point, rotating through various departments.

“Training is intense,” he says. “During the rotation, everything that you have learned comes together.”

In Peru, Mr. Cabrera-Abarca grew up with nine physicians in his extended family. It was his grandmother, a renowned local gynecologist and neonatal physician, who inspired him to go into health care as a profession. She taught him that health care is an important way to help others.

He eventually plans to go to medical school but, for now, he is eager to put his skills to work in a medical laboratory.

Ms. Frost

A nontraditional student, Joreen Frost was downsized a few years ago from the job she held for 15 years in medical transcription. A friend recommended she check out the medical laboratory science program at Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, Calif. She loved it and immediately enrolled, while also becoming involved in activities, such as serving as a class officer and volunteering at community health events.  

Ms. Frost is currently studying for her board exam and is delighted that Loma Linda University staff has indicated they would like her to apply for a job there.

“I like being part of the healthcare team,” she says. “I recommend this field to others who are interested in the sciences. Having a gone through a layoff before, candidly, I like that the profession has job security, and you can continue to develop your skills.” 


~/Custom.Templates/NewsroomDetail.aspx