ASCP 2014

General Sessions

Wednesday, Oct. 8, 8:00 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.

Bertalan Meskó, MD, PhD

A Guide to the Future of Medicine – Bringing Disruptive Technologies to Life in Health Care

Bertalan Meskó, MD, PhD

Medical Futurist Dr. Bertalan Meskó kicks off the meeting with an invigorating discussion focusing on ways that new technology, such as genomics and next-generation sequencing, are providing pathologists and medical laboratory professionals with valuable tools to improve patient care.

Described by Forbes Magazine as “The Geek Who’s Changing the World,” Dr. Meskó is the managing director and founder of Webicina.com, the first service to curate medical and health-related social media resources free of charge for patients and medical professionals.
 
“We need to think outside the box when it comes to the practice of pathology in the future,” says Dr. Meskó. “It’s important to know that we can use disruptive technologies, such as genomics, and still retain the human touch. It can be a huge yet exciting and challenging journey.”

In his quest to be ahead of innovation, Dr. Meskó has spent three years examining practical concepts that medical professionals can understand immediately and use in their practice. These are outlined in his soon-to-be released book, The Guide to the Future of Medicine. For his research, he interviewed 100 medical experts to predict the top 30 trends that will influence medicine in the years to come.

Dr. Meskó will address hot topics such as the role of genomics in improving patient care, the value of next-generation sequencing, and the need to “curate” genomic data. He’ll also explore the impact of these innovations on the consumer’s involvement in their own healthcare management.

Thursday, Oct. 9, 11:15 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.


Alfred Campbell, MD


Michael L. Talbert, MD, FASCP


Jane Pine Wood, ESQ

Evolving Pressures on Laboratories in 2014 and Beyond

Alfred Campbell, MD (Moderator)

Between Evolution and Extinction: The Place to Be

Michael L. Talbert, MD, FASCP

How to Stay Alive While Swimming With Sharks?  Legal Compliance in an Uncertain World

Jane Pine Wood, ESQ

Prominent healthcare attorney Jane Pine Wood, Esq., and Michael Talbert, MD, FASCP, chairman of the Department of Pathology and director of the Pathology Residency Program at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and chief of Pathology Services at Oklahoma University Medical Center, headline Thursday’s General Session. 

“It’s hard to stay abreast of all the changes occurring in the regulatory, compliance, and billing arenas,” says Alfred Campbell, MD, FASCP, president of the American Pathology Foundation (APF), who will moderate the session. “Jane Pine Wood is a nationally recognized expert on compliance and regulatory issues facing pathology practices of all types.

Dr. Talbert, who was president of a large statewide pathology practice in Maine before entering academia, envisions that the pathology profession will evolve in uneven and surprising ways. “You, the individual pathologist, must continue to do ‘traditional’ diagnostic medicine very well,” he said. “In parallel, however, we must create and experiment with new practice models that can be better adapted to whatever changes come in our particular environments.”

Friday, Oct. 10, 11:30 a.m. – 12:50 p.m.

Barbara Pierce Bush

Special Guest Speaker
One Person Can Make a Difference: Confronting Today’s Global Health Challenges

Barbara Pierce Bush
Co-Founder and President of Global Health Corps

Having traveled through Africa extensively and seen some of the world’s health problems firsthand, Barbara Bush was inspired to make a difference and harness the passion, energy and skills of her generation to overcome malaria, HIV/AIDS and the other epidemics of our time.

The difference that Bush made was founding the Global Health Corps, an organization that places fellows around the world to bring change to regions of the world that need it most. Bush’s vision has allowed for young leaders—whether their skill set is in finance, supply chain management or other fields atypical in the fight against disease and poverty—to bring their experience to bear in delivering health solutions to those who do not always have ready access to quality care.

In this powerful address, Bush talks about her entrepreneurial experience in starting the Global Health Corps and the experiences of those who are also on the front lines in delivering care to those in need. An inspiring young leader, Bush shows how everyone has the ability to give back—not only on the global stage but in their own communities as well.

Friday, Oct. 10, 11:30 a.m. – 12:50 p.m.


Virginia LiVolsi, MD, MASCP


Jennifer Hunt, MD, MEd, FASCP

Leadership & Mentoring – Setting the Agenda for Current & Future Leaders

Virginia LiVolsi, MD, MASCP
Jennifer Hunt, MD, MEd, FASCP

Dr. Virginia LiVolsi, a world-renowned expert in thyroid pathology who is professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, and Dr. Jennifer Hunt, MD, chair of the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Services in the College of Medicine at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS), present Friday’s General Session.

Dr. LiVolsi mentored Dr. Hunt and many pathologists who have gone on to prominent leadership positions in the field. She will discuss the mentoring program in UPenn’s Pathology Department and describe the criteria that need to be in place to make a mentoring program successful. At UPenn, incoming pathology residents are assigned a senior resident to mentor them during their first year of training.

Because the mentor and protégé need to work together as a team that first year, it is important that they are compatible and closely aligned in their specialty and career goals, according to Dr. LiVolsi. UPenn’s Pathology Department also has a mentoring program for new faculty members, who are paired with a more senior faculty member to guide them as they develop their teaching skills.

Dr. Hunt, who assumed her position as a department chair at UAMS before the age of 40, will discuss the best practices in a mentoring program from the perspective of a protégé.

Wednesday, Oct. 8, 8:00 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.

Bertalan Meskó, MD, PhD

A Guide to the Future of Medicine – Bringing Disruptive Technologies to Life in Health Care

Bertalan Meskó, MD, PhD

Medical Futurist Dr. Bertalan Meskó kicks off the meeting with an invigorating discussion focusing on ways that new technology, such as genomics and next-generation sequencing, are providing pathologists and medical laboratory professionals with valuable tools to improve patient care.

Described by Forbes Magazine as “The Geek Who’s Changing the World,” Dr. Meskó is the managing director and founder of Webicina.com, the first service to curate medical and health-related social media resources free of charge for patients and medical professionals.
 
“We need to think outside the box when it comes to the practice of pathology in the future,” says Dr. Meskó. “It’s important to know that we can use disruptive technologies, such as genomics, and still retain the human touch. It can be a huge yet exciting and challenging journey.”

In his quest to be ahead of innovation, Dr. Meskó has spent three years examining practical concepts that medical professionals can understand immediately and use in their practice. These are outlined in his soon-to-be released book, The Guide to the Future of Medicine. For his research, he interviewed 100 medical experts to predict the top 30 trends that will influence medicine in the years to come.

Dr. Meskó will address hot topics such as the role of genomics in improving patient care, the value of next-generation sequencing, and the need to “curate” genomic data. He’ll also explore the impact of these innovations on the consumer’s involvement in their own healthcare management.

Thursday, Oct. 9, 11:15 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Alfred Campbell, MD

Michael L. Talbert, MD, FASCP

Jane Pine Wood, ESQ

Evolving Pressures on Laboratories in 2014 and Beyond

Alfred Campbell, MD (Moderator)

Between Evolution and Extinction: The Place to Be

Michael L. Talbert, MD, FASCP

How to Stay Alive While Swimming With Sharks?  Legal Compliance in an Uncertain World

Jane Pine Wood, ESQ

Prominent healthcare attorney Jane Pine Wood, Esq., and Michael Talbert, MD, FASCP, chairman of the Department of Pathology and director of the Pathology Residency Program at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and chief of Pathology Services at Oklahoma University Medical Center, headline Thursday’s General Session. 

“It’s hard to stay abreast of all the changes occurring in the regulatory, compliance, and billing arenas,” says Alfred Campbell, MD, FASCP, president of the American Pathology Foundation (APF), who will moderate the session. “Jane Pine Wood is a nationally recognized expert on compliance and regulatory issues facing pathology practices of all types.

Dr. Talbert, who was president of a large statewide pathology practice in Maine before entering academia, envisions that the pathology profession will evolve in uneven and surprising ways. “You, the individual pathologist, must continue to do ‘traditional’ diagnostic medicine very well,” he said. “In parallel, however, we must create and experiment with new practice models that can be better adapted to whatever changes come in our particular environments.”

Wednesday, Oct. 8, 8:00 a.m. – 9:30 p.m.

Barbara Pierce Bush

Special Guest Speaker
One Person Can Make a Difference: Confronting Today's Global Health Challenges

Barbara Pierce Bush
Co-Founder and President of Global Health Corps

Having traveled through Africa extensively and seen some of the world's health problems firsthand, Barbara Bush was inspired to make a difference and harness the passion, energy and skills of her generation to overcome malaria, HIV/AIDS and the other epidemics of our time.

The difference that Bush made was founding the Global Health Corps, an organization that places fellows around the world to bring change to regions of the world that need it most. Bush's vision has allowed for young leaders—whether their skill set is in finance, supply chain management or other fields atypical in the fight against disease and poverty—to bring their experience to bear in delivering health solutions to those who do not always have ready access to quality care.

In this powerful address, Bush talks about her entrepreneurial experience in starting the Global Health Corps and the experiences of those who are also on the front lines in delivering care to those in need. An inspiring young leader, Bush shows how everyone has the ability to give back—not only on the global stage but in their own communities as well.

Wednesday, Oct. 8, 8:00 a.m. – 9:30 p.m.

Virginia LiVolsi, MD, MASCP

Jennifer Hunt, MD, MEd, FASCP

Leadership & Mentoring – Setting the Agenda for Current & Future Leaders

Virginia LiVolsi, MD, MASCP
Jennifer Hunt, MD, MEd, FASCP

Dr. Virginia LiVolsi, a world-renowned expert in thyroid pathology who is professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, and Dr. Jennifer Hunt, MD, chair of the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Services in the College of Medicine at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS), present Friday's General Session.

Dr. LiVolsi mentored Dr. Hunt and many pathologists who have gone on to prominent leadership positions in the field. She will discuss the mentoring program in UPenn's Pathology Department and describe the criteria that need to be in place to make a mentoring program successful. At UPenn, incoming pathology residents are assigned a senior resident to mentor them during their first year of training.

Because the mentor and protégé need to work together as a team that first year, it is important that they are compatible and closely aligned in their specialty and career goals, according to Dr. LiVolsi. UPenn's Pathology Department also has a mentoring program for new faculty members, who are paired with a more senior faculty member to guide them as they develop their teaching skills.

Dr. Hunt, who assumed her position as a department chair at UAMS before the age of 40, will discuss the best practices in a mentoring program from the perspective of a protégé.

Special thanks to our collaborating societies: