Lab Professionals Management Track

Learn more outside the laboratory.

This year's Annual Meeting delivers expert perspectives on the latest developments in laboratory medicine and the most effective strategies for leading your team. Enroll in four days of education, inspiration and collaboration, and return home with the knowledge you need to provide superior patient care.

Here's a complete look at programming customized for laboratory professionals like you.

Wednesday, October 31, 2012

8:00 AM - 10:00 AMFlow Cytometry Immunophenotyping with Emphasis on Differential Diagnosis of Difficult Cases with High Clinical Impact on Therapeutic Decisions

Speakers:

  • Wojciech Gorczyca, MD, PhD
  • Caroline An, MD
  • Lawrence E. Hertzberg, MD

Description:

Flow cytometry (FC) plays an important role in the diagnostic process, and often provides information which is helpful in the therapeutic decisions making process and prognostication of AML, especially APL, pediatric ALL, high grade lymphoma and distinguishing between B- and T-cell lymphoproliferations. Alternatives to FC analysis are few when it comes to analysis of blood or samples with limited cellularity. The course will focus on (1) diagnosis of different types of AMLs, with emphasis on differential diagnosis between APL and HLA-DR- AML, (2) monocytic proliferations, (3) high grade B-cell lymphomas, (4) HCL versus splenic lymphomas versus 'atypical' HCL, (5) T-cell lymphoproliferations, (6) analysis of limited samples, (7) differentiating hematogones from residual lymphoblasts, (8) FC pattern of normal maturing myeloid cells and features associated with MDS and MPN, (9) identification of minute clonal B-cell populations, and (10) differentiating thymocytes from T-ALL.

Learning Objectives:

  • Recognize phenotypic patterns of typical and atypical lymphoid and myeloid malignancies [including (a) APL and HLA-DR-negative AML, (b) features associated with neoplastic monocytosis, (c) patterns of low and high grade B-cell lymphomas, (d) differential diagnosis of mature T-cell lymphoproliferations, (e) hematogones versus residual blasts in B-ALL, (f) diagnosis of lymphomas based on limited sample (200 events collected), (g) features of dysmaturation associated with MDS, CML and other myeloproliferative neoplasms, (h) pattern of benign thymocytes versus T-ALL, and (i) rare clonal events].
  • Choose the most appropriate additional tests based on the flow cytometry findings and formulated differential diagnoses.
  • Recognize the therapeutic implications of the FC findings, which lead to better communication with treating physicians.

11:00 AM - 12:00 PMPromoting Good Laboratory Practices for Waived Testing

Speakers:

  • Nancy L. L. Anderson, MMSc, MT(ASCP)
  • Theresia Snelling, MBA, MT(ASCP)

Description:

Via live presentation, web demonstration, and distribution of educational booklets, this session will review trends in waived testing and studies to assess waived testing quality. It will also highlight recommendations for good laboratory practices provided by the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee and published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Reports: Recommendations and Reports (MMWR R&R). These include considerations prior to initiating waived testing and recommendations to improve testing quality throughout the testing process. Last, the session will describe educational materials derived from the MMWR R&R publication that are freely available from CDC for use as training resources to improve testing quality, reduce errors, and enhance patient safety. Meeting participants should attend this session if they provide consultation or oversight of waived testing and have responsibility for training testing personnel.

Learning Objectives:

  • Demonstrate waived testing trends and identify quality gaps in waived testing sites.
  • Discuss important considerations prior to initiating waived testing and describe good laboratory practices for each phase of the testing process.
  • Describe educational materials developed by CDC for use as training resources for waived testing personnel.

1:00 PM - 3:00 PMThe 5 Rights for Clinical Excellence in Transfusion Medicine - Part 1

Speakers:

  • Carolyn D. Burns, MD, FASCP
  • Phillip J. DeChristopher, MD, PhD, FASCP

Description:

The 5 Rights of Clinical Excellence in Transfusion Practice (Right product, Right patient, Right dose, Right time and Right reason) will be discussed in the context of the most recent evidence-based guidelines for RBC transfusion. A brief review of transfusion-associated adverse events will also be presented, including information from the Hemovigilance Network and the Serious Hazards of Transfusion Study (SHOT).Prepare by bringing your problem cases to discuss.

Learning Objectives:

  • Transform current evidence-based guidelines for RBC transfusion to apply key performance indicators for quality transfusion practice.
  • Apply educational materials to improve recognition of adverse effects of transfusion to better organize helpful reporting, clinical management and preventive approaches.
  • Review support from recent studies which offer guidance on RBC use in specific subpopulations such as patients with acute coronary syndromes and those requiring massive transfusion or elective orthopedic surgery.

1:00 PM - 3:00 PMCoagulation in the Year 2012

Speakers:

  • Donna Castellone, MS, MT(ASCP)SH

Description:

This session will provide an overview of the new issues in coagulation in particular with the new anticoagulants and the challenges that they present to laboratories. Additionally, an overview of testing for particular disorders will be presented to optimize information the laboratory will present. This will cover testing with regard to thrombophilia, bleeding disorders, lupus testing and platelet disorders.

Learning Objectives:

  • Enhance knowledge of new anticoagulants and their intended use.
  • Identify best practices in coagulation to optimize patient outcomes.
  • Analyze case study results and outcomes.

2:00 PM - 4:00 PMDelivering a First Class Presentation: Effective Use of Power Point and Principles of Public Speaking

Speakers:

  • Elizabeth M. Genega, MD
  • Richard Haspel, MD, PhD

Description:

This course is intended for any pathologist who utilizes PowerPoint when presenting at medical conferences or national/international education courses, and who wants to improve their presentation skills and learn to use PowerPoint in a manner which enhances the presentation. Portions of this course will be traditional didactic lecture but much of the course will involve audience participation in the assessment and modification of suboptimal slides. The course will cover creating ideal text slides and slides of pathology images. The basic principles of public speaking will be reviewed with good and poor examples provided. Lastly, the neuropsychology of learning (ie. how one learns) will be reviewed which will help participants to create effective pathology presentations. The benefits of attending this session include learning to create optimal pathology slides with PowerPoint and becoming a powerful and effective speaker.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will be able to identify optimal from poorly constructed slides of pathology images and text slides and develop the skills required for creating effective PowerPoint pathology slides.
  • Participants will develop an appreciation of presentation skills useful for any type of public speaking.
  • Participants will utilize current knowledge regarding the neuropsychology of learning to create effective pathology presentations.

3:00 PM - 4:00 PMSeven Secret Strategies to Put the F.U.N. Back in Your Lab Safety Program

Speakers:

  • Daniel J. Scungio, MT(ASCP), SLS, BS

Description:

Is your Safety Program infected with killer Bs? Is it Bland, Boring or Broken? Are you ready to put the F.U.N. back into your safety program? Daniel Scungio, also known as Dan the Lab Safety Man, will enlighten and amaze you with his insightful take on today's safety issues in the clinical laboratory, and this session will help you resuscitate your safety program in a cost effective manner. This program is all about results - simple, cost effective ideas that will help you find the real cause for an ineffective safety program, unleash the potential of your staff to become safety savvy and accept no more excuses for poor safety behavior.

Learning Objectives:

  • Recognize and understand the signs of a failing safety program
  • Develop tools to get staff actively involved in your safety program
  • Create a plan to re-energize your safety program in a step-wise, cost-effective manner

Thursday, November 1, 2012

8:00 AM - 10:00 AMThe Art of Scientific Writing and Manuscript Review

Speakers:

  • Frank H. Wians, PhD, MT(ASCP), DABCC, FACB
  • Steven H. Kroft, MD, FASCP

Description:

This workshop should appeal to both well-published and never--published pathologists and laboratory professionals who are interested in learning, in an audience participation mode, about effective writing techniques and the manuscript review process. The presenters will cover manuscript preparation from 'Instructions to Authors' to 'Response to Reviewer Comments.' Attendees will suggest improvements to real-world examples from 'deidentified' manuscripts to illustrate the 'do's and dont's' of manuscript preparation, proofreading, journal selection, and response to reviewer comments. Useful tips will be provided on how to review a scientific manuscript that reflects credit on the Reviewer, the authors, and the journal in which the manuscript is published by ensuring the quality and accuracy of both the science and the writing contained in a scientific manuscript. Attendees will be encouraged to prepare and submit scientific manuscripts for publication and to volunteer as Reviewers.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn effective writing techniques.
  • Apply effective writing techniques to improve the accuracy-brevity-clarity (the 'abc's' of effective writing) of each sentence in a scientific manuscript.
  • Prepare better scientific manuscripts and manuscript reviews.

8:00 AM - 10:00 AMThe 5 Rights for Clinical Excellence in Transfusion Medicine - Part 2

Speakers:

  • Carolyn D. Burns, MD, FASCP
  • Phillip J. DeChristopher, MD, PhD, FASCP
  • Jonathan H. Waters, MD

Description:

Several ideas and ideals of patient-centered blood management will be discussedproviding additional substantiation for maintenance of the 5 Rights of Clinical Excellence in Transfusion Medicine (Right product, Right patient, Right dose, Right time and Right reason). Pre-operative anemia management, blood salvage techniques and point-of -care testing to aid in transfusion decisions will be the primary focus.Be prepared to share blood management experiences and strategies from your institution.

Learning Objectives:

  • Apply initiatives of patient-centered blood management to current transfusion practice.
  • Appraise the use of preoperative anemia management, blood salvage techniques and point-of-care testing into hospital transfusion practice.
  • Integrate blood management principles into patient safety and performance improvement initiatives within the hospital.

9:00 AM - 10:00 AMLab Management University: Management Theory: Applying Emotional Intelligence in the Healthcare Environment

Speakers:

  • Elizabeth A. Wagar, MD, FASCP

Description:

Management theory is at the core of what we call "work." This session provides background and historical reference for management as a social science. Also, the session will provide participants with an understanding of how we as individuals can integrate our efforts into our healthcare work environments, whether we are clinical laboratory scientists, residents, or practicing physician pathologists, using the tools of emotional intelligence. This presentation presents core information required for laboratory administration knowledge and skills as required for post-graduate training programs.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify the history of management and the modern elements of management theory.
  • Determine your emotional intelligence and how it applies to a healthcare workplace management environment.
  • Identify opportunity to apply leadership skills.

10:00 AM - 11:00 AMUpdate Cardiovascular Disease Biomarkers: A Systems Approach

Speakers:

  • Martin H. Kroll, MD, FASCP
  • Ishwarlal Jialal, MD, PhD, FASCP

Description:

This course updates cardiovascular biomarkers and integrates them with other organ systems such as inflammation, renal disease and coagulation, allowing the participant to formulate translation of guidelines into clinical practice and develop best practices.. It will discuss biomarkers such as hsCRP, myeloperoxidase, adiponectin, non-HDL-cholesterol, Apo-B, lipoprotein phsopholipase A2, microalbuminuria, FGF-23, troponin and BNP, synthesizing the effects of inflammation, diabetes and renal function with its effects on these biomarkers Other markers, such as non-HDL-cholesterol or apoB may replace LDL-C, while lipoprotein phospholipase A2 (LP-PLA2) can predict the likelihood of plaque rupture. The session will discuss interpretation of natriuretic hormones (BNP and NT-proBNP) in the presence of renal disease, the cardio-renal syndrome, the use of ultrasensitive troponin in detection of myocardial infarction, and the detection of acute renal injury using NGAL KIM, and FGF23.

Learning Objectives:

  • Formulate means to translate the scientific basis for cardiovascular biomarkers (hsCRP, myeloperoxidase, adiponectin, non-HDL-C, apo-B, LPA2, BNP, microalbumin, troponin, NGAL KIM, FGF23) into useful markers for disease.
  • Develop best practices for cardiovascular and related biomarkers.
  • Recognize the interplay among organ systems and their effect on cardiovascular disease, with special emphasis on inflammation, diabetes mellitus, renal disease and coagulation.

10:00 AM - 11:00 AMWhen The Toxicology Report is Negative: The World of Designer Drugs

Speakers:

  • Amitava Dasgupta, PhD

Description:

Designer drugs were initially synthesized by clandestine laboratories in order to bypass legal consequences of manufacturing and selling illicit drugs. The common types of designer drugs include amphetamine analogs, opiate analogs (including fentanyl derivatives), piperazine analogs, tryptamine based hallucinogens, phencyclidine analogues and gamma hydroxy butyric acid (GHB) analogues. Most commonly encountered designer drugs are structurally related to phenethylamine, opioids and tryptamines. More recently, a series of new designer drugs has emerged in the market known as 'legal highs' or 'herbal highs'. These drugs include both herbal substances and synthetic designer drugs such as synthetic cannabinoids also known as 'spice' and 'bath salts' (JWH-018, JWH-073, JWH-250, HU-210, CP-47,497 and its homologues). This course will discuss both common and emerging designer drugs available in the U.S market and what can be done to detect such drugs in urine for proper diagnosis of drug overdose

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand common causes of negative toxicology report in an overdosed patient.
  • Be familiar with the next step to identify the agent either by doing further testing or requesting proper testing from a reference laboratory.
  • Be a better consultant to the ordering physician.

2:15 PM - 4:15 PMThe 5 Rights for Clinical Excellence in Transfusion Medicine - Part 3

Speakers:

  • Carolyn D. Burns, MD, FASCP
  • Phillip J. DeChristopher, MD, PhD, FASCP
  • Richard Haspel, MD, PhD

Description:

The 5 Rights of Clinical Excellence in Transfusion Medicine (Right product, Right patient, Right dose, Right time and Right reason) will be applied to the current evidence base for the use of hemostatic components (plasma, platelets and cryoprecipitate transfusion) in the perioperative/periproceduralsetting. What's new in the literature on the use of prothrombin complex concentrates in strategies for anticoagulant reversal will also be considered.Prepare by bringing your problem cases to discuss.

Learning Objectives:

  • Transform current evidence-based guidelines for plasma and platelet transfusion to apply key performance indicators for quality transfusion practice.
  • Employ evidence-based guidelines on hemostatic components to peri-procedural and peri-operative settings.
  • Assess the role and utility of available prothrombin complex concentrates to anticoagulation reversal strategies.

2:15 PM - 4:15 PMAdvancing Patient-Centered Care for Women Across Our Globe: The Laboratory is Part of the Puzzle

Speakers:

  • Eric  G. Bing, MD, PhD, MBA
  • Kimberly Allison, MD
  • John Nkengasong, PhD

Description:

This session focuses on the challenges of defining and delivering patient-centered care to women in different settings across the globe – using breast cancer care as a case study.

2:15 PM - 4:15 PMThe Diagnosis and Classification of Acute Leukemias - What Really Matters in the Molecular Era?

Speakers:

  • Anand Lagoo, MD, PhD
  • Michael B. Datto, MD, PhD
  • Catherine Rehder, PhD; Evan Kulbacki, MD

Description:

This session is of interest to practicing pathologists, residents, cytogeneticists and laboratorians involved in flow cytometry and molecular testing. Four didactic presentations are planned. The session is divided into four didactic presentations - (1) Outline the WHO classification of acute leukemias and contrast it with the FAB classification. Briefly narrate the major treatment options and overall prognosis in acute leukemias. Describe the disease defining and disease modifying mutations commonly seen in acute myeloid leukemia and examine their clinical associations. (2) Define the recurrent cytogenetic abnormalities in acute leukemias. Introduce the newer array based approaches used to identify genetic changes in acute leukemia. (3) Examine the role of flow cytometry in acute leukemia at diagnosis and follow up and provide examples of different types of acute leukemias. Explore the correlation between immunophenotype, morphology, and cytogenetic and molecular genetic abnormalities. (4) Suggest an optimal, resource appropriate, work up for new acute leukemia and how best to incorporate this diverse information into a unified pathology report.
The session begins with a pre-test and ends with a post-test and question and answer period. In addition, the participants have the opportunity to enter their diagnostic interpretations of typical cases throughout the session.

Learning Objectives:

  • Recognize the differences between the FAB classification and WHO classification of acute leukemias and the superior clinical relevance of WHO classification.
  • Correctly apply the WHO classification to new cases of acute leukemia using clinical history, morphology, flow cytometry, cytogenetics and molecular genetic information.
  • Devise a strategy based on the resources available in their practice to provide clinically relevant pathology report in acute leukemia cases.

3:15 PM - 4:15 PMBuilding Annual Antibiograms: A Team Approach

Speakers:

  • Lynda Glenn, MS
  • Alfred DeMaria, Jr., MD
  • Kerri Barton, MPH

Description:

Hospital antibiograms report aggregated susceptibility results of bacterial isolates tested against specific antibiotics. Antibiograms are generated annually and in a variety of formats. One or more hospital department(s) may be involved in the analyses. The Massachusetts Department of Public Health (MDPH) has been collecting hospital antibiograms since 1999. MDPH calls for the standardization of antibiogram generation using the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) M39A-3 recommendations in addition to utilizing a team approach, including microbiology, pharmacy, pathology, infection prevention and infectious disease. This didactic session will demonstrate the importance of involving a team of experts in generating the hospital antibiogram while using 'best practices' published in the M39A-3 CLSI document. MDPH will also communicate results from Massachusetts state-wide antibiogram data analyses including antimicrobial susceptibility trends that have been identified over time. Trend analyses can highlight similarities and differences in local, regional and national antimicrobial resistance patterns. However, standardization of these data is imperative in order to establish appropriate data comparisons, highlighting the importance of implementing CLSI recommendations.

Learning Objectives:

  • Create a team of healthcare professionals to analyze annual antibiogram data using best practices (CLSI M39-A3).
  • Disseminate antibiogram information to hospital departments to improve antibiotic use in the facility.
  • Design a quality improvement project to identify trends in antibiotic resistance using annual antibiogram data; communicate trends to healthcare professionals.

3:15 PM - 5:15 PMA Systematic Approach to Grading Blood Cell Morphology

Speakers:

  • Gene L. Gulati, PhD, SH(ASCP)

Description:

Complete manual differential leukocyte count, though performed in the clinical laboratory less frequently these days than in the past, generally consists of a 100-cell white cell differential, evaluation of blood cells morphology and verification of automated results. Blood cells morphology evaluation part is comprised of identification of individual red cell, white cell and platelet abnormalities with or without grading the abnormality level of each or some abnormalities. Because of its subjective nature, the approach to grading morphology varies a great deal among the laboratory professionals in a given laboratory and among laboratories. In an attempt to standardize or at least bring some consistency in the approach to grading and reporting blood cells morphology, the faculty of this session has published a grading guide and will in this session explain how the recommended system works. Participants interaction with the faculty will be encouraged throughout the session.

Learning Objectives:

  • Better appreciate the value of grading blood cell morphology.
  • Utilize a systematic approach to grading blood cell morphology.
  • Comfortably share his/her knowledge with others and thereby help bring consistency in grading of blood cell morphology among laboratory professionals and laboratories.

4:15 PM - 6:15 PMInternational Clinical Cytometry Society: Practical Flow Cytometry in Hematopathology - A Case-Based Approach

Speakers:

  • Joseph Digiuseppe, MD, PhD

Description:

Flow cytometric immunophenotyping is a vital tool in the diagnostic work-up of patients with suspected neoplasms of hematopoietic and lymphoid tissues, which may provide information that cannot be obtained using other diagnostic modalities, including morphology, immunohistochemistry, cytogenetics, and molecular genetics. This educational session will use a case-based approach to illustrate the principles and practice of flow cytometry in diagnostic hematopathology. Emphasis will be placed on interpretation of flow cytometric data, including recognition of normal and abnormal patterns of antigen expression, and integration of flow cytometric results with those of other diagnostic modalities to derive a final diagnosis.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the potential uses and limitations of flow cytometric immunophenotyping in diagnostic hematopathology.
  • Understand normal and abnormal patterns of antigen expression among major hematopoietic and lymphoid populations.
  • Integrate the results of flow cytometric immunophenotyping with those of other diagnostic modalities to derive a final diagnosis.

5:15 PM - 6:15 PMLaboratory Medicine Internship Program in Singapore - A Case Study

Speakers:

  • Siew-Kim Ong, MS

Description:

The strength and brand of ASCP has been an impetus in elevating the status of Clinical Pathologist profession worldwide. With the advent of ASCPi and its strong board of passionate leaders, it further consolidates and establishes the career of a Clinical Pathologist. Program on medical technology composes both theory and practical in Clinical Chemistry, Haematology, Bloodbanking and Microbiology disciplines. I describe here our internship program to equip students with skills and knowledge to pass the MLT(ASCPi) certification examination. In addition, this attempt will codify training of Clinical Pathologist as a longterm goal of maintaining sustainable interest, meaningful career and professionalism in Clinical Pathology.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn from our sharing session on Laboratory Medicine Internship program.
  • Possibility of duplicating our internship program at another laboratory especially in the Asia Pacific region.
  • Build value for the Clinical Pathologist as a coach, mentor and teacher.

5:15 PM - 6:15 PMLaboratory Assays for Alcohols and Glycols: Sorting Through the Tangle of Test Options

Speakers:

  • Matthew D. Krasowski, MD, PhD

Description:

This session will lead attendees through the laboratory assays useful in assessing ethanol use and in diagnosing and managing ingestion of toxic alcohols (ethylene glycol, methanol). The format will be an interactive 50 minute lecture.The emphasis will be on newly available assays (carbohydrate deficient transferrin, ethyl glucuronide, ethyl sulfate, ethylene glycol enzymatic assay) and recently published literature. The strengths and limitations of the osmolal gap will also be discussed in detail. The presenter will show examples of how these assays have been incorporated into testing algorithms at an academic medical center for treating toxic alcohol ingestions in the emergency setting and for assessing ethanol sobriety in substance abuse and liver transplant programs testing. Given the prevalence of ethanol abuse and toxic alcohol ingestions, the topics presented should be of broad interest to laboratory professionals.

Learning Objectives:

  • Compare the strengths and limitations of carbohydrate deficient transferrin, ethyl glucuronide, and ethyl sulfate in assessing ethanol use.
  • Explain the role of osmolal gap in the diagnosis and management of toxic alcohols ingestion, including common causes of elevated osmolal gap other than alcohols.
  • Appraise the analytical options for directly measuring toxic alcohol concentrations, including gas chromatography and enzymatic assays for ethylene glycol.

Friday, November 2, 2012

8:00 AMEffective Teaching and Mentoring a Diverse Group of Students or Employees

Speakers:

  • Marcia A. Kilsby, PhD, MLS(ASCP)cmSBB

Description:

This presentation is designed to provide techniques, tips, and insights into effective teaching and mentoring of students or employees that are from diverse ethnic, cultural, or international backrounds. Topics will include verbal and nonverbal communication differences when English is not the first language and learning assessment in the context of diversity.

Learning Objectives:

  • Utilize effective teaching and mentoring tecniques for successful learning outcomes.
  • Communicate with clarity with individuals from diverse cultural and ethnical backgrounds.
  • Evaluate educational experiences to determine the impact of diversity on the learners.

8:00 AM - 10:00 AMMolecular versus Conventional Microbiology: The Role of Pathologist in Optimal Test Selection

Speakers:

  • Amy L. Leber, PhD, D(ABMM), SM(ASCP), MB(ASCP)
  • Janice Matthews-Greer, PhD, D(ABMM), MT(ASCP)

Description:

In this session, a case based approach will be used to review the proper test selection for diagnosis of infectious diseases with an emphasis on nucleic acid amplification tests (NAAT). Using PowerPoint presentations the faculty will present patient case scenarios and then have questions for the audience as to the diseases in the differential diagnosis and the tests that should be ordered. Because of the rapid pace of change in the area of medical microbiology many of the diagnostic algorithms are changing with a wider use of molecular tests. In some instances NAAT has become standard of care while others standard techniques are still acceptable or even preferred. Participants will be asked to pick the best test for diagnosis of and infectious disease. The faculty will then review the current understanding and research related to different disease states such as encephalitis/meningitis, sexually transmitted infections, healthcare associated infections and others.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will identify testing algorithms for infectious diseases involving both traditional and molecular tests.
  • Participants will list at least 3 situations were molecular testing has become standard of care for infectious disease diagnosis.
  • Participants will be able decide which infectious disease molecular tests might be incorporated into their own practice setting for optimal patient care.

2:00 PM - 3:00 PMHb A1c: Potential Effects of Analytical and Clinical Factors on Result Interpretation

Speakers:

  • Ross J. Molinaro, PhD

Description:

This session on Hb A1c will bring real world case exercises to you. The content to be covered includes this commonly used biomarker, known mostly for monitoring average glycemia in diabetic patients, that has recently garnered much attention. Now recommended as a criterion for the diagnosis of diabetes, this presentation will address the clinical utility of Hb A1c and some limitations that may preclude its usefulness in patient care.

Learning Objectives:

  • Compare existing criteria for the diagnosis of diabetes.
  • Describe the advantages and disadvantages in methodologies for Hb A1c testing.
  • List the potential effects of analytical and clinical factors on Hb A1c interpretation.

3:00 PM - 4:00 PMInfections Without Borders

Speakers:

  • Jeannette Guarner, MD, FASCP

Description:

In 2003, the well publicized outbreak of SARS coronavirus reminded us that emerging infectious agents do not need passports to cross international borders. Every day, there are unnoticed infectious agents that cross from one country to another using a variety of vectors. For example, respiratory viruses pass from person to person in invisible air particles, anthrax can be traded in furs, while plague and monkeypox can be imported in rodent pets. International travelers may return home with an infection acquired abroad or foreign visitors may enter a country with an unsuspected infection. This session will use case presentations and the audience response system to discuss the epidemiologic, pathologic and microbiologic aspects of some of these infections (malaria, mycobacteria, plague, dengue, and yellow fever). Because of public health concerns, encountering patients with these diseases triggers a series of responses, not only at the hospital level, but also at the state and country level which allow communities to respond and control outbreaks. Participants will be able to recognize these diseases and consult with the appropriate public health entities. They will be able to assess their capability to diagnose these diseases using tests available in their hospital and those that need to be sent-out to outside laboratories including the state health laboratory.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify the epidemiology, clinical and pathologic presentation and microbiologic aspects of malaria, mycobacteria, plague, dengue, and yellow fever.
  • Recognize these diseases and consult with infectious disease physicians and the appropriate health care entities.
  • Assess what tests are available in their laboratory for diagnosing of these entities and what tests will need to be sent out.

4:00 PM - 5:00 PMEffective Teaching and Learning

Speakers:

  • Edward Klatt, MD

Description:

"This interactive session will guide participants through current principles of educational theory applicable to effective adult learning. How can we become better teachers for others and better learners ourselves? Published research in learning theory and practices will be summarized and integrated into strategies that empower attendees to develop and optimize delivery of educational content in learning sessions that promote long-term knowledge retention. The session will incorporate attendee feedback and an illustrative team-based learning exercise will be utilized."

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe qualities of good teaching that promote active learning styles with long-term retention of knowledge.
  • Compare and contrast cognitive challenges for novice, intermediate, and expert learners.
  • Identify and apply techniques for enhancement of teaching and learning.

4:00 PM - 5:00 PMBlood Smear Review - Diagnoses You Don't Want to Miss

Speakers:

  • LoAnn Peterson, MD, MASCP

Description:

This session will discuss the importance of blood smear review in evaluating acute hematologic disorders. Early recognition of the possibility of these disorders not only impacts the subsequent work up but may also influence therapy and the subsequent outcome of the patient. Medical technicians/technologists and/or pathologists are often the first individuals to recognize these disorders. For example, recent studies document that early deaths of patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) have not decreased with ATRA therapy even though overall survivals have improved dramatically. Since the current recommendation is that ATRA be initiated at the first suspicion of APL, it is crucial for the laboratory to recognize the possiblility of APL so that therapy is not delayed. Participants in this session will learn the key feactures of several acute hematologic disorders identifiable on a blood smear examination and the importance of effective communication with the treating clinicians.

Learning Objectives:

  • Recognize the possibility of acute promyelocytic leukemia on a peripheral blood smear review.
  • Recognize the possibility of othere hemtologic emergencies by a peripheral blood smear review.
  • Recognize benign conditions on a blood smear examination that could be confused with a malignant disease.

Saturday, November 3, 2012

8:00 AM - 9:00 AMLaboratory Professionals Review: Flash Driving through Hematology to Hemostasis

Speakers:

  • Betty Ciesla, MS

Description:

If you are feeling less than prepared for the hematology section of your certification exam then you need to refocus by attending this session. We will move through material at lightening speed, but stop for serious questions and answers where the audience shapes their knowledge. The topics to be covered include red cell disorders, leukemias, chronic and acute, myeloproliferative neoplasms, lymphoid disorders, platelets, factors affecting coagulation systems, inhibitors and thrombotic disorders. Major highlights of each topic will be featured.

Learning Objectives:

  • Correlate major developments in red cells diseases with respect to morphology,and laboratory diagnostics.
  • Describe the WHO classification for acute myeloid leukemias, related myeloid and lymphoid disorders and theories of both.
  • Describe the systems involved in hemostasis to include platelets, clotting factors, natural occurring inhibitors, physiologic anticoagulants, and thrombotic conditions.

8:00 AM - 10:00 AMHemoglobinopathies: The How, Why and What

Speakers:

  • James D. Hoyer, MD, FASCP
  • Jennifer L. Oliveira, MD

Description:

"This session will focus on two aspects of hemoglobinopathies and thalassemias: 1) Describing the methodology, 2) Presenting various case studies including interaction with the audience in how to proceed in the workup of each case. The major methodologies used in the diagnosis of hemoglobin disorders will be reviewed. The advantages and limitations of each will be reviewed. A series of case studies will be utilized to illustrate the appropriate workup of hemoglobin disorders. The extent of the workup needed based on the complexity of the case will be emphasized. Appropriate utilization of resources will be stressed. Audience participation is encouraged."

Learning Objectives:

  • Review the methodologies commonly in use currently to diagnose hemoglobinopathies and thalassemias and discuss the advantages and limitations of each method.
  • Utilize a series of interactive case studies to illustrate the common and clinically significant hemoglobin disorders.
  • Discuss the appropriate utilization of testing in the workup of these disorders, particularly more esoteric or expensive technologies such as mass spectrometry or molecular testing.

9:00 AM - 10:00 AMLaboratory Professionals Review:Chemistry for Certification

Speakers:

  • William J. Korzun, Ph.D.

Description:

This session will address the need for laboratory professionals to prepare for the MLS(ASCP) or C(ASCP) certification exam. It will integrate the MLS Competency Statements and Content Outline for Clinical Chemistry with a series of rapid fire questions and answers that cover major analytes and diseases. Questions will be interspersed with overviews of major topic areas with suggested strategies for efficiently and effectively reviewing chemistry material for the certification exams.

Learning Objectives:

  • Develop strategies for self-directed review of specific analytes, methods, instruments, diseases, and calculations in preparation for the chemistry portion of the certification exam.
  • Correlate specific chemistry lab results with the most likely explanations for those results.
  • Identify erroneous lab results and assay or instrument conditions, and actions most likely to establish the source of error and correct the problem.

10:00 AM - 11:00 AMHow to Build a World-Class Laboratory Services in Resources Limited Settings: Case Study Uganda

Speakers:

  • Ali Elbireer, MBA, MT(ASCP)

Description:

In developed countries, the majority of medical decisions are made on the basis of quality laboratory testing according to established standards and enforced regulations. With the large investments of global health initiatives into resource limited settings in sub-Saharan Africa, there is an opportunity to establish quality laboratory testing by overcoming barriers such as physical infrastructure, quality management plans according to external standards, and human resource capacity building. Strengthening laboratories could change the paradigm from empiric, algorithm-based clinical care to care based on accessible test-based accurate diagnoses.

Learning Objectives:

  • Explain the current status of the laboratory system in resources limited settings - Case study Uganda.
  • Discuss strategies for identifying and building laboratory services capacity in resources limited settings.
  • Discuss the role of Accreditation in Strengthening Laboratory services in Africa.

10:00 AM - 12:00 PMTeam Approach To Diagnosis of Fungal Infections

Speakers:

  • Jeannette Guarner, MD, FASCP

Description:

Fungal infections are becoming more frequent because of expansion of at-risk populations such as patients receiving transplants and longer life of immunosuppressed patients. Fungi previously considered non-pathogenic, including a variety of hyaline and dematiaceous molds, are now common infections of immunosuppressed patients. This has brought diagnostic dilemmas including defining infection versus colonization. In addition, the range of endemic fungal infections has expanded because of climate change, extension of human habitats, ease of travel, and shifting populations. Nowadays, pathologists and microbiology laboratories are asked to make a diagnosis in smaller pieces of tissue. Additional diagnostic challenges include the presence of resistance to different drugs by different fungi even with the expanded therapeutic armamentarium.
Histopathology continues to be a rapid and cost-effective means of providing a presumptive or definitive diagnosis of invasive fungal infections. However, pathologists and clinicians need to be aware of the limitations and pitfalls of tissue diagnosis. This workshop will use case presentations and the audience response system to discuss the epidemiologic, pathologic and microbiologic aspects of fungal infections. Participants will recognize these diseases in tissue, communicate to clinicians with appropriate evidence-based diagnosis that will help treatment, and recommend alternative tests for organism-specific diagnosis.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify the epidemiology, clinical and pathologic presentation and microbiologic aspects of fungal diseases that occur in immunocompetent and immunosuppressed individuals.
  • Recognize these diseases in tissue and recommend alternative tests for diagnosis when cultures are not available.
  • Communicate the results in an appropriate evidence-based manner.

10:00 AM - 11:00 AMDouble Take: Mimics of Acute Leukemia in the Pediatric Population

Speakers:

  • Sunita Park, MD

Description:

Learn the most common pitfalls in the diagnosis of pediatric leukemia in a case scenario format. More than just hematogones, we will discuss mimics of B-LL, T-LL, and AML and discuss the importance of appropriate laboratory testing to arrive at the correct diagnosis, emphasizing the importance of flow cytometry. You won't want to miss this engaging and informative session!

Learning Objectives:

  • Become familiar with benign/reactive conditions that can mimic pediatric acute leukemia.
  • Understand how to order appropriate testing to facilitate the correct diagnosis.
  • Incorporate ancillary techniques, such as flow cytometry and molecular diagnostics, into arrive at the correct diagnosis.

11:00 AM - 12:00 PMRole of MT as Clinical Care Team Member: Duties and Responsibilities of Clinical Lab Professional Recognizing Abnormal Cells in Acute Cancers

Speakers:

  • Seema Siddiqui, MT

Description:

It will describe the entire background of a lab professional and also their role in patient care.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn the role of a medical technologist in everyday lab work and cancer care.
  • Value the profession of medical technology and recognize the role played in patient diagnosis.
  • Understand the relationship that medical technologists have with physicians and patients.

12:30 PM - 2:30 PMLaboratory Medicine in the Midst of Disaster

Speakers:

  • Sean M. Tucker, MLS(ASCP)cm, MBA
  • Carla Orner, MT(ASCP), MBA
  • Connie Wilkins, MT(ASCP), MSHA;

Description:

Prepare yourself and your lab to deliver lab services in disaster.Disasters happen unexpectedly. A good manager prepares for the unexpected. What tests are needed in different types of disasters, what laboratory equipment can stand the rigors of temperature, humidity and unstable electricity?Heart to Heart International (HHI) has responded to disasters for 20 years. Point of care technology has opened the opportunity for laboratorians to accompany other medical professionals in the first wave of care givers.HHI working with pathologists and clinical laboratory scientists from Vanderbilt University developed a Laboratory Disaster Backpack to include essential testing. Details about instruments, reagents, procedures and communication in disaster will be shared including experiences from tornados, earthquake and tsunami.This presentation will include competency training for volunteers willing to respond to a disaster.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will evaluate their laboratory's ability to function in a disaster.
  • Participants will utilize their new knowledge to develop a disaster plan to enable their lab to offer patient services after a disaster.
  • Participants will have the required competency training necessary to respond to natural disasters as a volunteer under Heart to Heart International.

12:30 PM - 3:30 PMClinical and Laboratory Standards Institute: The Nuts and Bolts of New Test Implementation of Molecular Diagnostics into a Routine Clinical Laboratory

Speakers:

  • Leslie Hall, M. M. Sc.
  • Jean Amos Wilson

Description:

This session will be an interaction of two speakers and will provide the framework for implementation of a molecular test into a clinical laboratory. Although it is geared for the laboratorian not familiar with molecular testing, other stakeholders will benefit from this session. Presentations will describe the “nuts and bolts” of new test implementation including “how to know what you don’t know”, with emphasis on CLSI documents, the “nitty gritty” of strategic planning with examples of “go and no go” scenarios, designing your workflow with emphasis on “uni directional workflow” in existing laboratories, new test validation with emphasis on FDA approved or cleared tests, the safety perspective of molecular testing and information on how to stay current with each of the molecular subspecialties (infectious disease, oncology, genetics and pharmacogenetics). Participants will be asked to provide examples of molecular testing under consideration for implementation in their clinical practice for strategic business analysis. Questions will be welcomed on each aspect of new test implementation.

Learning Objectives:

  • The entire management team (which includes but is not limited to: laboratory directors, supervisors, technical specialists, quality specialists, teaching technologists, etc.) will gain an understanding of the nuts and bolts of the implementation process for a new molecular test into laboratory practice.
  • Participants will have a 'hand's on' experience with strategic business planning using a SWOT analysis (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats) example of molecular test implementation of a 'go' and 'no go' test.
  • Discussion will center around establishing 'uni directional workflow' for nucleic acid molecular testing in an existing clinical laboratory.

1:30 PM - 3:30 PMStress: Recognizing and Managing What's Bothering You

Speakers:

  • Christine Pitocco, MS, MT(ASCP)BB

Description:

Stress should not always be considered a bad thing. Sometimes it propels you into action and may even propel you into making changes in your life. Stress can cause wear and tear on the body. One must be able to identify their stressors and how they react to stress before it can be managed.This session is intended to teach the audience, how to identify stressand stressors what it can do to a person if not managed, and techniques that can be implemented to manage stress.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify your stressors.
  • Describe the health implications if stress is not managed.
  • Identify stress management techniques.

2:30 PM - 3:30 PMA Practical Guide to the Laboratory Diagnosis and Monitoring of Monoclonal Gammopathies

Speakers:

  • Jonathan Genzen, MD, PhD

Description:

This session is designed to enhance the core-knowledge of monoclonal gammopathy testing for all members of the clinical laboratory team. Updates on recent advances in the field will be provided throughout the presentation. The session will begin with a concise clinical review of monoclonal gammopathies. The fundamentals of laboratory testing for these conditions will be presented in an easy to understand language. Common laboratory interferences and technical limitations will be addressed. Through an interactive case-based approach, the session will also review common and challenging patterns observed on protein and immunofixation electrophoresis of serum and urine. The presenter will deliver an interactive 45 minute lecture with integrated questions and clinical scenarios for the audience to respond to. This will be followed by a 10 minute question and answer period.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify at least four clinical conditions where testing for monoclonal proteins is essential.
  • Identify the strengths and weakness of assays used to diagnose and monitor monoclonal gammopathies.
  • Interpret common patterns observed on protein and immunofixation electrophoresis of serum and urine.

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